1. arcaneimages:

Julie Dillon 

    arcaneimages:

    Julie Dillon 

    1 hour ago  /  138 notes  /  Source: juliedillon.deviantart.com

  2. (via southeasternmoon)

    1 hour ago  /  197 notes  /  Source: clalareginadelcuore

  3. serapart:

forgotten V. by MaryaS

    serapart:

    forgotten V. by MaryaS

    1 hour ago  /  14 notes  /  Source: serapart

  4. photo

    photo

    1 hour ago  /  1,057 notes  /  Source: perpetual-dawn

  5. fumettierotici:

by Anthony Jean

    fumettierotici:

    by Anthony Jean

    (via elreymono)

    1 hour ago  /  209 notes  /  Source: hoperesideswithinthismess

  6. bettyfelon:

Josie and the Pussycats, by Phil Noto

    bettyfelon:

    Josie and the Pussycats, by Phil Noto

    (via elreymono)

    1 hour ago  /  1,572 notes  /  Source: comicartfans.com

  7. pappubahry:

The asteroid Itokawa, photographed by Hayabusa.
Itokawa is by far the smallest object featured on this blog, measuring only about 535 metres in length, and less than 300 metres in width and height.  Its surface gravity is tiny (much less than a millimetre per second squared), so the spacecraft entered an orbit round the sun that was roughly parallel to the asteroid’s orbit, here about 7km away.  So the rotation seen in the gif is Itokawa’s rotation, not the result of a camera orbiting around it.
Hayabusa later landed on the surface, collected some dust, and returned it to Earth for analysis.  Google Images doesn’t seem to know of the photos near the surface, so I uploaded most of the good ones to an Imgur album here (edit: Google Images doesn’t recognise the photos I upload to it, but searching for ‘itokawa surface’ brings up some scattered results).  I wouldn’t have guessed that a small asteroid would comprise lots of little rocks, just barely held together by their very weak gravity.  But apparently such rubble piles are common.

    pappubahry:

    The asteroid Itokawa, photographed by Hayabusa.

    Itokawa is by far the smallest object featured on this blog, measuring only about 535 metres in length, and less than 300 metres in width and height.  Its surface gravity is tiny (much less than a millimetre per second squared), so the spacecraft entered an orbit round the sun that was roughly parallel to the asteroid’s orbit, here about 7km away.  So the rotation seen in the gif is Itokawa’s rotation, not the result of a camera orbiting around it.

    Hayabusa later landed on the surface, collected some dust, and returned it to Earth for analysis.  Google Images doesn’t seem to know of the photos near the surface, so I uploaded most of the good ones to an Imgur album here (edit: Google Images doesn’t recognise the photos I upload to it, but searching for ‘itokawa surface’ brings up some scattered results).  I wouldn’t have guessed that a small asteroid would comprise lots of little rocks, just barely held together by their very weak gravity.  But apparently such rubble piles are common.

    (via infinity-imagined)

    1 hour ago  /  86 notes  /  Source: pappubahry

  8. photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    photo

    1 hour ago  /  14,599 notes  /  Source: kellamartinart

  9. honey-rider:

Illustration: Al Buelle

    honey-rider:

    Illustration: Al Buelle

    (via klappersacks)

    1 hour ago  /  123 notes  /  Source: honey-rider

  10. 1 hour ago  /  6 notes  /  Source: thrall-demonsweatlive

  11. (via grawlyx666)

    1 hour ago  /  34 notes  /  Source: girls-n-cars

  12. (via daku-kingudamu)

    1 hour ago  /  6,398 notes  /  Source: dat-sick

  13. (via thrall-demonsweatlive)

    1 hour ago  /  218 notes  /  Source: threechainlinks

  14. pixography:

Bicicleta Sem Freio

    pixography:

    Bicicleta Sem Freio

    1 hour ago  /  233 notes  /  Source: pixography

  15. (via klappersacks)

    1 hour ago  /  47 notes  /  Source: allstoriestold